Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Which would you choose?

What if the cause of your greatest suffering was also responsible for your greatest joy?
That’s the question at the heart of Mark Salzman’s “Lying Awake” (ISBN 0-375-40632-8).
And while many parents may say, Duh, of course that’s true, Salzman’s lead character is a cloistered nun whose profound spiritual visions are accompanied by severe migraines.
Should she undergo medical treatment to end the migraines and risk losing the visions that have brought her such peace?
It’s an intriguing dilemma.
I was fascinated by this glimpse into cloistered life — after listening to people in love with the sound of their own voices all day long, that vow of slience is mighty appealing — and drawn to Sister John of the Cross. The reasons for some of her decisions and her struggles with their consequences resonated with me despite my very different life choices.
It’s a quick read (just 181 pages) that left me wondering, which would I choose?

- Tricia Ambrose

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1 Comments:

Blogger Asian Sensation said...

To me, any time a story comes up where someone has visions or sees apparitions is fascinating.

Even out on the street, the topic of Marian apparitions or visions brings a response from the public. Sure, it may not be the best response, but you're never going to be bored with what you hear.

I remember the News-Herald doing a story on Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine in Euclid for celebrating an anniversary or a special occasion with that shrine. A ton of comments resulted after that piece.

Back to fiction. I read your post and an immediate parallel book jumped out at me:

http://www.amazon.com/Mariette-Ecstasy-Ron-Hansen/dp/0060981180/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1231948944&sr=8-1

Mariette in Ecstasy, by Ron Hansen, sounds somewhat similar. A pretty, 17-year-old joins a religious convent at the turn of the 20th century. She supposedly has visions of Jesus. Half of the convent believes her and the other half doesn't.

Granted, this one deals with faith and whether or not she believes in the visions. Is she a liar or is she a saint herself--while your review focuses on whether or not the protagonist should undergo treatment, which would stop the pain, but also stop her peaceful visions.

If you watch EWTN and the rosary at 9:30 with Mother Angelica, you'll know what I mean. Saying the rosary is a great way to fall asleep because it's so peaceful.

God bless!

January 14, 2009 at 11:12 AM 

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